New Life, No Instructions: A Memoir

May 4, 2014 - Comment

The Pulitzer Prize winner and New York Times bestselling author of Let’s Take the Long Way Home now gives us a stunning, exquisitely written memoir about a dramatic turning point in her life, which unexpectedly opened up a world of understanding, possibility, and connection. New Life, No Instructions is about the surprising way life can

Buy Now! $3.10Amazon.com Price
(as of September 21, 2017 12:39 pm CDT - Details)

The Pulitzer Prize winner and New York Times bestselling author of Let’s Take the Long Way Home now gives us a stunning, exquisitely written memoir about a dramatic turning point in her life, which unexpectedly opened up a world of understanding, possibility, and connection. New Life, No Instructions is about the surprising way life can begin again, at any age.
 
“What do you do when the story changes in midlife? When a tale you have told yourself turns out to be a little untrue, just enough to throw the world off-kilter? It’s like leaving the train at the wrong stop: You are still you, but in a new place, there by accident or grace, and you will need your wits about you to proceed.
 
“Any change that matters, or takes, begins as immeasurably small. Then it accumulates, moss on stone, and after a few thousand years of not interfering, you have a glen, or a waterfall, or a field of hope where sorrow used to be.
 
“I suppose all of us consider our loved ones extraordinary; that is one of the elixirs of attachment. But over the months of pain and disrepair of that winter, I felt something that made the grimness tolerable: I felt blessed by the tribe I was part of. Here I was, supposedly solo, and the real truth was that I had a force field of connection surrounding me.
 
“Most of all I told this story because I wanted to say something about hope and the absence of it, and how we keep going anyway. About second chances, and how they’re sometimes buried amid the dross, even when you’re poised for the downhill grade. The narrative can always turn out to be a different story from what you expected.”
 
Praise for New Life, No Instructions
 
“A page-turner [that will] inspire you . . . eloquent and uplifting.”—Good Housekeeping
 
“Graceful and reflective.”—USA Today
 
“An uplifting journey . . . This book celebrates finding support where you least expect it.”—Woman’s Day
 
“Quiet but powerful . . . an absorbing meditation on grief and rebirth in midlife.”—More
 
“[A] beautifully written memoir.”—Parade
 
“Gail Caldwell offers the kind of wisdom and grace you’d wish a friend, sister, or mother might deliver. . . . Fans and new readers alike will find comfort in Caldwell’s voice.”—The Boston Globe
 
“[Caldwell] confronts, with pluck and fortitude, the hurdles that life throws her way.”—Publishers Weekly
 
“[A] thoughtful, wide-eyed view of the world . . . [Caldwell] ably explores the shifts of our hearts.”—Kirkus Reviews
 
“Getting old, as they say, is not for sissies, and no one would call Pulitzer Prize–winner Caldwell a wimp. . . . There may not have been a road map for the life-changing trip [she] was about to take, but . . . Caldwell realized she had the power to endure.”—Booklist
 
“New Life, No Instructions shows us how a lot of little things . . . add up to something much more significant: a new life, embarked upon and embraced.”—BookPage

Comments

Yours Truly says:

One Dragon at a Time Gail Caldwell is one tough woman. Having survived polio as a baby in Texas (she didn’t walk until she was two and a half.) she rallied and had a sports-free childhood at a time when girls weren’t expected to be athletic anyway. She went on to raise serious hell in the sixties and settled down later to an impressive career in journalism in Boston.Along the way she put aside the drinking that was jeopardizing her life. She learned to row on Massachusetts’ Charles River. And through it all, she had a series of cats and dogs that she loved probably more than the men she took up with and parted from. Having reconciled to the idea she’d never be a wife or mother, she suffered a series of losses over six years in her fifties–her closest woman friend to cancer (the topic of a previous memoir I haven’t read), then her parents’ deaths one after another, and finally, her beloved Samoyed sled dog, Clementine. It nearly did her in.It makes sense that aging will be…

Niki Collins-queen, Author "author" says:

An amazing account of pain, loss and recovery Gail Caldwell’s beautifully written memoir “New Life, No Instructions” is informative, wise and uplifting.She calls the polio she contracted when she was a couple of months old her “base line.” It’s the “wall” she pushes against and says everybody has one.Although she doesn’t believe in miracles she says, “I do think you need to be listening when the thunder cracks, because that way you get to be there for the light show that follows.”Over a ten year period she lost her best friend, father, mother, and Clementine, her beloved Samoyed dog. Also the polio she contracted as a baby had begun to reduce her walk to a painful limp and it was getting worse.Everything changed when a new doctor said she needed a hip replacement and that her leg could be lengthened. Her recovery began when she, for the first time, no longer saw her body in decline and realized she could live pain free.After surgery and during her brutal rehabilitation Gail was stunned by the…

Susan R. Meyer "Life Architect" says:

Captures the Moment Perfectly 0

Comments are disabled for this post.