Running Away: A Memoir

May 4, 2014 - Comment

When journalist Robert Andrew Powell finished his first marathon, he cried, cradled in his father’s arms. Long-distance runners understand where those tears come from, even if there are others who will never grasp what drives someone to run 26.2 consecutive miles in a grueling mental and physical test. Powell’s emotional reaction to completing the race

Buy Now! $2.94Amazon.com Price
(as of September 21, 2017 12:39 pm CDT - Details)

When journalist Robert Andrew Powell finished his first marathon, he cried, cradled in his father’s arms. Long-distance runners understand where those tears come from, even if there are others who will never grasp what drives someone to run 26.2 consecutive miles in a grueling mental and physical test. Powell’s emotional reaction to completing the race wasn’t just about the run, though. It was also about the joy and relief of coming back up after hitting rock bottom.

Running Away is the story of how one decision can alter the course of a life. Knocked down by a divorce and inspired by his father, Powell decided to change his mindset and circumstances. He moved to Boulder and began running in earnest for the first time in his life. Over the 26.2 chapters that follow, Powell grapples with his past, gaining insight and hard-won discipline that give him hope for the future.

Comments

nitsa says:

A winner! I just finished reading Robert Powell’s book, “Running Away”, which I could not put down. Juxtoposing stories of his life and captured brillantly in the book’s 26.2 chapters I was amused and enthralled with his story. Without giving too much away, Powell starts his story off by telling us about his divorce, his life in Miami and his dream to qualify for Boston. After feeling let down career wise and at the same time finding out his ex-wife is now living in Europe, Powell embarks on a personal journey to Boulder, Colorado. He is on a mission to qualify for Boston within a year. The stories are intertwined with his past and gives us an insight as to why he is who he is and why he is doing this. Focusing on past relationships with the women in his life he goes back to when the relationships started, evolved and dissapated at times showing us his emotional roller coaster with humor and pain. His most important relationship is his father, who at the age of 37 ran his first Boston…

Maria Roncalli di Montorio says:

One of those books 0

brian d foy says:

Solid writing Although Powell started running as a way to correct his life, this book is unlike any of the other running books. The writing and storytelling are solid. Everything ties together well and flows naturally from one thing to the next. The only thing that the book misses is an ending that wraps up his attempt to get into the Boston Marathon. Maybe his story is ongoing and there is more to come.Instead of worshipping runners and the sport, he has a clear-eyed view of his experience. He moved to Boulder but saw it as a bit of a Stepford town crowded with running coaches, life coaches, body workers, and many other sorts of people trying to make a buck off the affluent amateur athletes who have taken over the town. He goes back to the Native Americans who traveled through this area and spoke of the curse of an area so beautiful that you don’t want to leave.And, unlike most running books, he doesn’t brag about his abilities. Quite the opposite in fact; he continually…

Comments are disabled for this post.